Putting Others Before Yourself

Ashley - Phoenix, Arizona
Entered on May 12, 2009
Age Group: 18 - 30

I believe in putting others before yourself. Since day one, humans have craved compassion. As babies, we cry for our mothers; as life continues, we look to our friends for sympathy, advice, and love. Our mothers and friends usually take joy in comforting, encouraging, and giving us the gift of compassion. By doing so, they have taken their own time, adoration, and energy into caring for someone else.

By giving compassion, we uplift the people in our lives and strengthen bonds. Humans need to humble themselves, in turn, realizing their problems are not the end of the universe. Albert Einstein explains the necessity of compassion: “A human being is a part of the whole called by us universe, a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feeling as something separated from the rest, a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty.” By freeing ourselves from this prison, we must humble ourselves. Deny what you want personally to give compassion to those around you. Think about how good you feel after driving to your friend’s house at two in the morning because they need you or giving up something special because someone out there actually needs it.

Humans rely on others—friends, family, spouses, coworkers, etc., so be the person that others can rely on. When you put others before yourself, you honestly get so much in return. The first step in changing the world is to care for the world more than you care for yourself. Therefore, zoom out of your own life and take a look at the big picture. If we all did so, we would see the poor, sick, deprived, sad, and lonely as our main concern verses our own problems. If we humble ourselves enough to grant compassion to the poor, sick, deprived, sad, and lonely, wouldn’t the world be a better place?