This I Believe

Juan - El Paso, Texas
Entered on April 24, 2009

My beliefs lie within people that I consider being relatives, friends, and strangers. I believe that my friend will fight to develop and become a better person, for himself and society; I believe that a stranger will do the right thing, and take into consideration other strangers’ interest. Everyone has their free will—set of personal values and morality. People choose to act a certain way and react in another through their set of values and opinions. I believe that people will do the right thing, correct their mistakes, and strive for a greater good. Through my observations I have come to the realization that friends and strangers have treated education with their own set of values and ideals.

As I went past my peers and friends in Cathedral High School, I listened to them discuss college applications and scholarships—especially as the year progressed and application deadlines crept closer. It appeared that most of the seniors did not care to be bothered about their paths and future careers. Although I still believed that their attitudes would change for the better. Personally, education is the door to greater opportunities and should be processed with a mature attitude, a set of values and ideals.

It seems that there is a growing epidemic within our high school students at a national level; most of today’s teenage students do not have an idea how much of an impact their college decisions and careers will have on them throughout their life. Students are not researching on a career path and are delaying applications and scholarships till the last few days approaching due dates. This habit of seniors, and underclassmen, is detrimental to their education and success because they will not be able to fully take advantage of all the opportunities that can be attained in today’s system of education such as the quintessential accelerated education through advanced courses (dual enrollment, advanced placement, pre-advanced placement, etc.) and financial-need scholarships. At a personal level, many of my friends and acquaintances—those I met during high school and in college—regret their means of approaching applications for colleges and scholarships, whether it was due to an underutilized high school education or lack of motivation for their applications.

My friends have seen past their mistakes. They understand that education cannot be taken so lightly, else failure will shortly be around the corner; an apathetic mood towards educations will result in the development of detrimental habits – incomplete assignments, unexcused absences, and failing grades. Today, I admire their passion and commitment to develop and attain better work ethics: to progress in a chess game there must be sacrifice; to progress in education, there must be personal, social, or financial sacrifice. Today, I still believe everyone will see past their own personal mistakes.