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Erik - Victor, Idaho
Entered on March 26, 2009

Do you ever have the feeling that you were born in life to do something that you love? I do. I know in my very core that I love to write. I always thought that I should practice writing for when I was old enough to publish my works. But certain events in my life made me realize that I could write and publish my works, today. Now, I believe that anyone can be what they want to be, when they have the courage to start.

In 2007, my family was stressed; my parents were often gone after school, and when they were around they were still busy working, so we didn’t really spend much time together. I had loved to write; maybe I inherited it from my father. We had both started writing several novels. My brother wrote short stories and poems, and my mother edited all of our works.

One sunny afternoon during spring break, when we were all outside, in the hammock, my dad spoke his idea to have us bond together again. He suggested that the four of us write a book together as a family. We talked about possible adventure stories, and we began to dream and get excited about the possibilities before us. We were almost frenzied in our ideas, thoughts, that feeling of togetherness, and the certainty that this was going to be the best book ever! Later at dinner, we talked more, and it was then that we made a commitment to each other, the book, and to follow our dream through to the end. Then our journey began.

The prospect of writing and publishing a book together probably had affected me the most. I would be able to write a really great book and get it published! Before, as I foolishly used to think, I was an adult. I would have my family to help get it published.

This unexpected turn from our previous life is the way I came to believe that anyone can be what they want to be, when they have the courage to start. I learned many values from this project, too: perseverance when our writing seemed to have come to a standstill and we needed to plow through, patience when I had to rewrite my “perfect scene” several times. I learned to be open to suggestions, and keep my sense of humor when my dad recited his mantra, “The only true writing is in rewriting.” But I could write another whole book on what I learned from the process of writing our first one.

Most importantly the commitment we had made as a family on that sunny spring day taught me that one can’t just dream and fantasize about doing something they love; one has to act on it. I know that I am truly happy when I write. I plan to be a writer, and I already am. I also strongly suggest that everyone should think of their dream, and start now!