An Unhappy Ending

Paige - Ridgefield, Washington
Entered on March 23, 2009
Age Group: Under 18

Sitting in a classroom the American Dream seems silly. I’m 15 years old and am not an adult. I cannot make many choices or do the things I want. All I am told is to keep working and do my best. Every morning I wake up, try to look how society wants me to, and go to school and het my perfect grades. I dear adults talking about giving up their dreams to support their family, but I have never had to give up anything.

My father is a great example of a man who’s dream has changed based on age and choice. His dream used to be to race cars and build houses. Instead of pursuing that, he now manages a business a makes much more money than he would doing his hobbies. This was not his dream 25 years ago. But if you ask him, he will tell you there’s never a day he regrets his choice. Now he is successful and can provide our family with what we need.

Dreams require sacrifice. It then becomes your call on how much you’re willing to give up in order to live your life doing the thing you’re passionatte about.

My dream would be to become a dancer. But my dream is also to be successful and secure. Dancers don’t het paid well and it is an extremely unstable world. I cannot have both. Either I go after what I love or something soceity accepts more. I would be lying if I said I think life is a happy ending.

I believe there is no such thing as the American Dream. There is no specific life or set of achievements which would be perfect in everyone’s eyes. I believe you have your own dreams. Whether you take a chance and go for them is up to you. Society’s expectations make it very risky to go after the things you love. To be honest, I will hopefully work in a field I like, but I believe my dream to be a dancer will be pushed in the shadows. It will follow me around, but never be put into the spotlight.