The Road Called Life

Nicholas - Hudsonville, Michigan
Entered on January 23, 2009
Age Group: Under 18

The Road Called Life

It was a cold and bitter winter afternoon. I was following a close friend through winding subdivisions in Georgetown Forest. We were taking the expanded version of this drive simply because we could. That, and because of how much fun a good driver can have on snow. We crossed through an intersection, and as I glanced left down the perpendicular street I saw a pickup truck, sliding almost completely sideways around a sweeping turn. Just when it seemed he would lose control and spin out, the back tires gave him an almost guiding shove, depositing him back onto his path. Like a person who thrives on and thoroughly conquers the speed bumps, ice patches, pot-holes and other challenges presented by being alive.

It was at that moment that I made the distinction between two very different kinds of life. The kind of driving force that the pickup had, and the dragging movement that other people have.

The “Pickup Drive”: The motivation that keeps this majority of people going is that of a rear wheel drive vehicle. It is made of an intricate and secure support system that uplifts and inspires an individual. This “system” is composed primarily of friends and family. They can be very different and yet they both have one thing in common: they push you to be more. They push you to do better and go further in whatever you do, as long as you enjoy it. These are the people that are the most powerful propulsion for life. If your life seems to be fishtailing out of control, they give you a gentle nudge to realign yourself. When you start to wander from your lane in traffic, they will lead you back into it.

The “Front Wheel Drive”: The people who use a front wheel drive method of living are driven only by their own aspirations and needs. They have little to no foundation of encouragement. These people will deny help and shrug off compliments; they don’t think they need them. This person sees themselves as a monster truck among go-carts. When he or she starts to edge out of their lane, they will not accept help until they are totally off course.

I believe in rear wheel drive.

Every time I go for a cruise, whether literally, or metaphorically, I am reminded of the undying devotion and durability of the “Pickup Drive,” a gift which I was graciously provided with in my life. The fact that my car happens to be front wheel drive serves as an important reminder of how blessed I am. It also makes me aware of how I should at least try to be supportive to everyone, but particularly those with “front wheel drive.” Because if I can help them switch to a rear wheel drive lifestyle, show them that there is always someone willing to encourage them, I have just made a significant improvement to their driving experience on Life Boulevard.

The advantages of such a movement transferring system between the engine and the road, its expanded limits of driving enjoyment and security, which make rear-drive cars much better than front wheel drive commuters, are advantages that cannot be compensated for.