This I Believe

Noah - State College, Pennsylvania
Entered on January 19, 2009

More commonly it is called synergy, the idea that individually two things can be quite weak, but when they come together they become strong. When trying to recognize where the problems in my life come from, I can usually trace it back to this idea of parts not working together. Absolutely anything can be thought of as a part or having a role, and when each part acts correctly, that is when the magic happens.

The realization started small. Running down a court, everything in my periphery is blurry, no… I am completely blind. I am just a part, a part of a team. The first pass is made, then a dribble and a cut back. I am sprinting down the lane because I know where the ball is going to be. I knew ten seconds ago. I knew yesterday. I have always known. All five of us are the same, just performing different actions, and my duty at this moment is to jump, catch and finish. It is already over, and as I turn around down the court preparing to play defense, I can see the ball push the net as it falls through the hoop. There are only four people I can feel that way with, and on a basketball court is where we experienced synergy for the first time.

Then I saw that this truth was unlimited one day while I was writing. Writing can be frustrating, often forced, and dispassionate. Fortunately, this wasn’t one of those times. I didn’t feel obligated to write those common phrases we go to when constructing a sentence, nor did I feel like deleting and typing the same sentence over and over. Maybe it was the sad music on the radio or the comfortable temperature in the room, but it was easy to see how the words worked together on the page and the correct ones to choose, each one a small part making up the whole of my paper. It was prose that felt like poetry.

It has been easy since these experiences to try and envision the part I play in anything as a role that promotes a greater goal. I have been able to do this without losing any since of individuality or importance chiefly because of the results. Apply it to work, play, and relationships with family and friends. Recognize that what you are doing makes it easier for those you are working with to accomplish their responsibilities and that they are doing the same for you. My man, Ben Lee, would simply say, “We’re all in this together.”