Six Inch Scar

Chad - Belmont, Michigan
Entered on January 13, 2009
Age Group: 18 - 30
Themes: setbacks, sports

“Play like a champion today!” A sign above the door exiting the University of Notre Dame’s football locker room is a simple reminder to the players. This simple slogan not only warns players to play hard in the game at hand but, as they see it, they are also reminded of much more. They are reminded of their duty as a teammate; they are reminded of the past and tradition of their football program; they are reminded of the future ahead of them. I believe in life’s simple reminders. They allow us to live life openly and to keep our goals and objectives readily accessible in our minds. As a person constantly seeking to improve my self and my lifestyle, I often find it hard to remember exactly how I once vowed to become better. I find it difficult to keep my objectives in mind for very long and eventually forget about them; leaving me in the dust with that feeling that you are forgetting something, but you don’t know what it is.

Simple reminders can allow us many opportunities and conveniences. Reminders are part of our everyday lives; there are many forms. They can be as simple as automated e-mail messages or post it notes. Reminders can be taken from memorable experiences, whether they are good or bad. Reminders can have a simple message, like putting the ham in the oven at six, or they can lead to drastic lifestyle changes after a traumatic event, such as a car accident. We may not realize it very often, but without constant reminders our lives would contain much hassle. I believe that without them, life would be a clutter of forgetfulness and confusion.

The biggest reminder in my life so far came in my senior year of high school in the midst of my last season playing football. A seemingly disastrous slip up, caused by my lack of concentration and focus while working out, left me with a plate in my arm and a matching reminder on the inside of my forearm. The dark, six inch long scar is a permanent reminder of lost hope, humiliation, and also my mortality. The event of snapping a bone in my dominant arm gave me a new perspective on life, and surprisingly for me it turned out to be a positive experience. As a teenager, I realized that I am not invincible and that bad things could happen to me; they were not something that only happened to other people. I also found that people are very supportive and understand when others make mistakes. Many of the things, that I experienced after the accident and while being temporarily handicapped, provided motivation for me to take advantage of everything I could, while I am still able to. Everyday I am reminded of many life lessons just at the sight of my arm, and I am thankful for this reminder.