An Expression of Merriment

Corinne - Florence, Montana
Entered on January 12, 2009
Age Group: Under 18

Have you ever laughed so hard that your sides hurt? That water streamed from your eyes? That you had trouble breathing? That you were incapable of even moving? It’s one of those times where the reason for this outburst is most likely a pointless one. This kind of laughing is unforgettable. The power of laughing is something that I feel very strongly about. Laughing has been proven to be healthy and energizing. It also provides great memories as well as a better sense of comradery between you and the person or people you share that moment of joy with.

One memory I have is when my friend and I were playing pool at my house. She hit the ball and it, in turn, bounced across the table and up into my stomach. Within seconds we were both on the floor rolling around, gripping our stomachs as our laughter twisted our muscles. Tears threatened to create a small pool on the cement as they continued down our cheeks. It was several minutes before we were able to stand again. I love that memory because it still brings a smile to my face as I picture the event that led to our fit of laughter.

There was one other time I remember where another friend and I could not contain our laughter. We were both at camp and I was teaching her how to make hemp bracelets. Every now and then we would hold our creations next to each other to compare. She held up her twisted, tangled, misshapen bracelet and declared, “Mine is so ugly.” We burst into giggles, which then continued to uncontrollable laughter. We nearly rolled off the bunk bed. This memory can still make us laugh out loud, not because of the reason, but because we remember the good time we had.

Both of these examples are just laughter for the sake of laughing. They don’t really have a good purpose like laughing because you heard a funny joke. However, I think the meaningless kind of laughing is one of the best kinds of laughter. It’s better to laugh in an odd situation than to stand there, feeling awkward. Another part about laughter that I believe in is that laughter is the best medicine.

If I’m sad, sick, or angry, I try my best to find a way to laugh. The best example I have to explain what I mean is a time when I was at work. It had been a really rough day for me. I had just gotten braces on, my entire group of friends was fighting and falling apart, homework was mounting to the point that I didn’t think any of it would get done, and on top of that, I had to face five hours of sandwich making. My co-worker noticed that I seemed to be slightly on the depressed side. That is, I wasn’t talking and telling him stories, I tended to just sit and observe my feet during our breaks, and I did all my tasks about three times slower than normal After trying to pry the reason from me for several minutes, he started joking around about anything and everything, doing things that would at the least make me smile if not laugh out loud. Because of him, I was able to go throughout the rest of the night in a better mood, despite my bad day. I was more willing to get around my problems rather than sulk about them. This was partly due the fact that I didn’t want him on my case any more but the bulk of it was because laughing had put me in a lighter mood. I saw my problems in a more rational way and then they didn’t seem as important or as huge as I had thought they were.

Finally, I try to laugh as much as I possibly can. No matter what the situation is, laughing can always make any day just a little better. Laughing makes me feel light-hearted and easy-going, and I also feel better about myself. Whether it’s for the stupidest reason or the best reason, there is no excuse for why anyone cannot or should not laugh.