Drama of Divorce

Alexandria - Clayton, Georgia
Entered on November 6, 2008

I’ve always had a stable home life. I grew up with a mom, dad, and a sibling, that never made me feel unloved, unwanted, or unappreciated. I guess that’s why witnessing a divorce reveled surprises to me. Luckily, the tragedy didn’t happen to my family, but unfortunately it did happen to a close friend.

I met David during the primary stages of his parent’s divorce. Up until the heart wrenching separation he had obtained the ideal family: his father was the preacher of a local church and a sheriff for the town, his mother held a prospering job and they had been married for more that twenty years. He had two siblings, an older brother in college and a younger brother in elementary school.

David had previously thrived on life, he was a popular high school student and his sense of humor was widely enjoyed. He was dedicated to football and was a scholar athlete. Unfortunately, his parent’s choice to get a divorce brought about daily hardships that concentrated not only his life, but his sibling’s life to a struggle. David’s home life created a seemingly irreversible gap, and his grades began to deteriorate as he slipped into a depression. Being aware of the situation empowered me to be an encouragement to his life but others unaware of the reason why he put his head down at lunch, watched as his bright future slipped through his fingers.

By befriending David, I caught a glimpse of the continuous depth of sorrow that divorce forces upon many uninformed hearts. I realized that two people severing their love for one another effects more people than the two. By using the word uniformed to describe hearts I am implying that many people affected by a divorce, don’t choose to be. This became evident to me as I attempted to bring joy back into my friends life by trying to express my care, but still I stood unresponsive to the famous, “You just don’t understand.” Sure, I could encourage him and possibly comfort him but he’s right, I didn’t understand and I still can’t comprehend the pain that he bore. After all, I had never been in his place, and learning that made me aware of the fact that children don’t have a voice in the decision of whether or not their mommy and daddy eat at the same dinner table, or attend the same church, or live together anymore. Yet, the children are allowed to carry the weight of the situation on their shoulders and bear a plethora of guilt.

In conclusion to the terrorizing drama of divorce, I believe that every person deserves the right to have a loving and stable home. I also believe that I am forever in debt for my parents providing this for me…