A stong nation vs a stonger culture

David - Columbia, Maryland
Entered on October 27, 2008

The evaluation of the American poetical system, through the statistical evidence provided to the Surgeon General from the Center for Disease Control (CDC), is replacing what I know to be a rich and valuable American culture.

As each layer of what will eventually become American history is pealed back by the hands of time we must be in tune with deeper processes which national direction or agendas may necessitate. When culture comes face to face with the unquestionable hard facts of modern science, the richness and texture of a healthy culture will surely become subservient.

Presently we are on a track heading toward expanding a process of the establishment or maintenance of a high degree of healthy habits with is to produce cost savings in the trillions of dollars. Are we providing an equal amount of effort in preserving our cultural heritages?

We first created the Office of the surgeon general in 1798. Congress established the U. S. Marine Hospital Service—predecessor of today’s U.S. Public Health Service—to provide health care to sick and injured merchant seamen. Today The Office of the Surgeon General (OSG), under the direction of the Surgeon General, oversees the operations of the 6,000-member Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service and provides support for the Surgeon General in the accomplishment of his other duties. This position is the center of modern day health agendas which strongly influences public health directives which have spilled over into laws.

When our families will not or can not provide for our health needs, it becomes out of necessity, our right to depend on our communities. If our communities do not offer that which we need to prevent or cure illness, then it seems reasonable to suggest that it is a civil responsibility to set in place a procedure to support an avenue for future generations’, so on and so forth, up to our federal government. Through this type of hierarchical process we create a more perfect nation.

I was raised by two young people who would mature to be the best parents that their culture could accommodate. The generation before them it was not uncommon to raise a family on a fully self contained farm on ten acres of land. Dependence on the family structure would have been a matter of life or death. It broke many a mothers’ heart to watch her offspring walk down the aisle and move next-door into a different world, as the next layer of the times were pulled away from the core structure of the family.

I realize that this may not have been the case for every member of the “baby boomers” but it has become my observation that I do fall into the medium of a phenomenon that I shall refer to as “progress”.

Through formal education and personal observation I now realize that it is not by chance that millions of parents sat back in humbled emotional confusion as they held onto their time proven values while “progress” pealed from them their traditions giving way to national agendas.

My father would sit at the table at a family function and talk of his memory of his grandfather who would purchase a can of tobacco. He rolled the tobacco into a fine cigar and on a cool summers evening after a hard days work would smoke that cigar down to the butt. The next day he would remove the burnt end of the butt with his pen knife and use it as chewing tobacco. Then, according to the story he would spit the used chewing tobacco onto the lid of the can that the tobacco came in and sit it on the window seal to dry in the warm sun. Once the watery smoked, chewed and dried tobacco had dried he would put it in his pipe and smoke it. If the old man were alive today, I wonder what warnings the surgeon general may have compelled his children to question him with about such thriftiness?