The Broken Trust

Sadia - Peoria, Arizona
Entered on August 29, 2008

During sophomore year in Medical Science, I thought I met my best friend. With a class full of strangers, I isolated myself in the back of the dull room and blanketed my timid face. Suddenly, Melanie, the new girl, energetically stepped into my trapping bubble to begin a conversation. We exchanged the basics of ourselves. Believe or not, we had similar interests. The conversation seemed to last for a few hours, even though we talked for one class period. It seemed like I found her in a “Best Friend Search” from Quizilla. Unlike my other tom-boy friends who spent free time on anime and comics, I shared my interest of shopping with Melanie. With Melanie, I burst out of my bubble and fearlessly became the true goofball that I am. I thought this relationship would last. But I was wrong.

As the months slipped by, I found out that Melanie desired to manipulate me. Usually during our girl’s night out or school, Melanie, her eyes drooping and mouth shaped into a frown, continuously nagged me to lend her money. I gave in to her constant demand. I feared losing my best friend. To make sure that our friendship was mutual, I confronted her that she needed to give back something. I naively accepted Melanie’s agreement about buying me lunch. A few days later, when I ordered lunch, I surprisingly found out that the money had disappeared from my lunch account. I couldn’t believe it. What happened? I became suspicious about the money. I thought all this time that Melanie brought lunch for me. In reality, she did not pay back. How could she do this to me? Back then, I could not believe that Melanie would stab me in the heart. I feared facing reality. I felt like a submissive dog who did not know what to do. Fortunately, she transferred to another school the following year. I didn’t have to deal with wounds anymore. Even though the wounds healed, my heart still aches that my best friend would commit such an act.

I used to believe that a friend is someone who shares an interest, but now I realized that friendship is more than common ground. A real friend does not manipulate others, but instead friendship is a mutual relationship. From the phony friendship, I learned to be careful in any relationship. After Melanie wounded me, I believed that trustworthiness is the backbone of a true friendship.