I belive in mistakes

Kelsea - santa monica, California
Entered on June 16, 2008
Age Group: Under 18
Themes: carpe diem

I believe that a mistake is in the eye of the beholder.

I believe in the divine urge people possess which provides them with an inclination to go against what is, or what is assumed to be best for them.

Some people call that making a mistake, some people call it taking a risk.

I live for the boy who snowboards a slope too big for him then winds up with a face full of snow. I support the person who has an early day but still stays out late because they couldn’t bear to leave the person they were out laughing with. I support that they risk making a mistake because they hold out hope in positive results.

I dwell in the unsettled belly of the student who chooses the route of procrastination and spends the afternoon with their toes in the sand in their head in the clouds while they should be studying for finals. I encourage the child who chooses a different political spectrum from their parents. I root for the person who chooses not to go to college, and still manages to thrive in the ‘real world’ solely based on their smile and dedication. I travel with those who decide not to have a destination and to simply stay in the hostel closest to the next train stop – even if that freedom means getting lost or having your wallet stolen. I support these people because they do what feels right to them, not what feels right to other people.

I believe in making a choice that may leave you without diplomas, promotions, itineraries, or nest eggs.

I believe in the possible thrill of a mistake. But I believe in the consequences of a mistake even more. Self-disappointment, angry parents, and agitated bosses are the hurtle you must overcome in order to determine the worth of your mistake. If you make a mistake and decide that the consequences outweigh the experience, you learn from it, you don’t repeat it, and you grow because of it. But an even greater accomplishment would be to make a mistake and decide that the thrill outweighed the inevitable displeasure. Then you know you have truly found something of value.

So I encourage you to take a risk, even if that means making a mistake. Make that mistake on purpose. Snowboard a slope that’s too big for you. Decide if the juice was worth the squeeze. But decide because you had the experience, not because someone else told you ‘that might be a mistake’. Never make a decision based on fear, because then you close yourself off from a world of surprise and possibilities. When you gain experience, your own sense of morals and judgment will be defined. Allow your decisions to surprise you.

I believe in purposely making a mistake. Better yet, multiple mistakes.