David vs. Goliath: The Underdog Story

Benjamin - Briarcliff Manor, New York
Entered on June 13, 2008
Age Group: Under 18

As a child I was always taught that the best things in life are earned and that nothing comes easy. It is this ideology that has inspired me to be a firm believer in the power of the underdog. While some look to goliaths for inspiration, such as Superman or the Hulk, I am quick to look to their Davidic counterparts Clark Kent and Bruce Banner, as a source of strength. The real comic book heroes are not the ones hurling comets back into space or lifting tall buildings on their shoulders, instead it was their alter egos who balanced a life of crime fighting with a life of good deeds and hard work. I believe in the underdog.

My support for the underdog has existed in me ever since I realized that I was one of the smaller guys competing in sports. This is most apparent in my support of underachieving teams in sports; whether it is the Jets, Mets, or Rangers. While some may call these teams lost causes, losers, or failures I see them as opportunities for the underdog to rise up and achieve greatness without the expectations or anticipation of most fans. My appreciation for hard work has inspired me to support the teams that pull themselves up by their bootstraps and rise from the bottom of the pile to the top of the heap. I believe that sometimes empires must fall for a new and improved one to rise up. For example, America formed as a result of the toppling of a frontrunner and just this year the New York Giants knocked off the nearly perfect dynasty of the New England Patriots.

When push comes to shove everyone loves an underdog even if they don’t know it yet. In sports the only thing people enjoy more than the rising of a dynasty is its fall at the hands of an unexpected or possibly less talented team. I believe in balance and underdogs offer the counterweight needed to balance a society eager to support the goliaths of the world.

As a child I was always taught that the best things in life are earned and that nothing comes easy. It is this ideology that has inspired me to be a firm believer in the power of the underdog. While some look to goliaths for inspiration, such as Superman or the Hulk, I am quick to look to their Davidic counterparts Clark Kent and Bruce Banner, as a source of strength. The real comic book heroes are not the ones hurling comets back into space or lifting tall buildings on their shoulders, instead it was their alter egos who balanced a life of crime fighting with a life of good deeds and hard work. I believe in the underdog.

My support for the underdog has existed in me ever since I realized that I was one of the smaller guys competing in sports. This is most apparent in my support of underachieving teams in sports; whether it is the Jets, Mets, or Rangers. While some may call these teams lost causes, losers, or failures I see them as opportunities for the underdog to rise up and achieve greatness without the expectations or anticipation of most fans. My appreciation for hard work has inspired me to support the teams that pull themselves up by their bootstraps and rise from the bottom of the pile to the top of the heap. I believe that sometimes empires must fall for a new and improved one to rise up. For example, America formed as a result of the toppling of a frontrunner and just this year the New York Giants knocked off the nearly perfect dynasty of the New England Patriots.

When push comes to shove everyone loves an underdog even if they don’t know it yet. In sports the only thing people enjoy more than the rising of a dynasty is its fall at the hands of an unexpected or possibly less talented team. I believe in balance and underdogs offer the counterweight needed to balance a society eager to support the goliaths of the world.