SAT’s should not determine our future

Jennifer - Tappan, New York
Entered on June 11, 2008
Age Group: Under 18

I believe that SAT’s should not determine our lives or my future. My name is Jennifer Lee; I am currently a junior in high school. Starting sophomore year the students take the PSAT and start to stress about SAT 2’s or the SAT 1 that they will take in the following year. My parents have been stressing me about SAT’s since middle school. I do not know why. Maybe it’s a Korean thing, but my parents have been sending me to SAT prep school since the end of middle school. After while it only became a routine and I only went to meet my friends. I don’t take the classes seriously anymore because it feels like just another school day. Unfortunately, I regret not trying in those classes, and now it is my junior year and the SAT’s are my biggest concern, but my scores are not improving that much.

Having two older brothers that received incredible SAT scores and that attend NYU Stern’s School of Business and Boston College for PT my parents pressure me more about SAT’s and college. Everyday my parents say to me, “You have to do well; get at least a 2000”, and other things along those lines. But, truthfully it’s impossible for me to get a 2000, and I hate it that this test, this 4-digit number, determines my future. This number determines whether I get into a good college or not, and if not I will get a good job or not and if I don’t get into that dream school or find that dream job, that low score will eventually crush my dreams! On the test one mistake can make a huge difference in your score and we are human beings, we make mistakes. Those mistakes we make on the test will decide the rest of our lives.

We are suppose to take this timed, 5 hour long test and be sustained throughout the whole thing and have our brain function the same way as they did in the first hour we started the test. That’s just impossible, I’m exhausted after the third hour. Reading passage after passage, solving question by question, trying to remember every math equation and grammatical errors possible is extremely tiring. The score we get on the SAT’s our junior year determines the college we go to, the college we go to determines our job, and our job determines our success later in life. Although with all the mistakes I make hopefully, either with good score or bad score it will lead me to a successful life in the end.