The Realism of Mistakes

Jessica - Ambler, Pennsylvania
Entered on May 27, 2008
Age Group: 18 - 30

The Realism Of Mistakes

“If you’re not making mistakes, then you’re not doing anything. I’m positive that a doer makes mistakes.” I believe that it is acceptable to make mistakes. Without making mistakes and learning from them, experiences would have no quintessence.

My mom always asks me, even to this day, why I take hard classes. She constantly wants to know why I set myself up for failure. I, on the other hand, don’t look at it that way. I enjoy a challenge, I don’t understand why, but that has always been the case. I wasn’t comfortable or happy being in a class that I didn’t actually have to apply myself in. I was bored, and annoyed most of the time. People would constantly want to know why I actually did the work, when they always thought there was no point and it was a waste of time. I finished my freshman year of high school with a 4.0, which my parents expected because of my extremely simple course load. So I have been gradually taking more difficult classes, and thusly has helped to put a strain on the relationship with my parents. They do not think it is acceptable for me to get poor grades even though my classes are harder, and criticize me for taking them when I “knew I wasn’t going to do well”.

I do not think that anyone should ever feel the need to regret a prior decision they made, if it was what they what they wanted to do. I still do not believe that taking more difficult classes was a mistake on my part. I wanted a challenge and that is exactly what I got. Making mistakes and learning to live with them is critical to ever hope to learn the mere rationality of life. In order to cope with the fact that I was going to make mistakes, I actually had to go out and make them. Even though it is an elementary concept, some people do not think that making mistakes is acceptable. The truth is everyone has to deal with “failure” at one time or another. Making simple mistakes may make you better prepared for future troubles that may come your way. No one, not even teachers, politicians, or presidents are safe from the epidemic known as mistake-making. Not lingering on past failures is another key to accepting negative situations.

I hope that one day I will be able to explain my whole view on failure. All I know is that I understand my reasons for my own choices, and am able to be held accountable for my own mistakes.