The Way I Live Life

Alexis - St. Louis, Missouri
Entered on May 15, 2008
Age Group: Under 18

I believe that optimism cures sadness. That if you make the best of every situation, something better will come along.

It was about a year ago, and my family was looking for a new house. We thought we had found the perfect one. It was beautiful, had a pool, and was close to school. We put a contract on it, and thought for sure it was the house for us. When the inspection came back though, we found that it had a big water pressure problem. If we bought the house, we would have to tear out all the walls and not live in it for a couple of years. My whole family was devastated because we had our hearts set on that house. But we decided not to buy it, and continue looking.

Almost a year later, we have found an amazing house. It is unique and is everything that we have been looking for, and more. We put a contract on the new house, and it has no major problems. We were ecstatic; we had found our dream home. Now, we are getting ready to sell our house, and soon we will move in. When some people might not look for houses for a while after an experience like this, we were optimistic and continued looking to find something better than the original.

Last year, I went to a camp in Michigan called Miniwanca. It was my second year going, and I was genuinely exited for it. Plus, two of my friends were coming with me that year. Coming off of the bus, I could smell the honeysuckle in the hot and humid air. I walked up to the check in desk, loving the feeling of sand squishing beneath my tennis shoes. “You will be in cabin 36 with Courtney, Meg, Libby, and Rose.” I stood there, shocked. None of my friends’ names were there that I had known. Why wasn’t I in a cabin with my friends? I don’t even know any of the people who are in the same cabin as me! As I approached my cabin, I felt depressed. This was not going to be the fun three weeks I had imagined.

Once I met the four girls who I would be cabin mates with and my cabin leader, Amanda, I felt a little better. But I still was thinking of all the fun my other friends were having, being in the same cabin together. Within the next couple days, I became really close friends with Meg. We made a pact; we would have as much fun as possible, making a fool of ourselves, and then laughing at it. We would not think about my other friends who were in the same cabin together. We did this all through the three weeks, and looking back on it now, I do not regret any of it. I made the best of the situation through laughter and optimism, and I am glad that I did not sulk the whole time because I was not with my friends.

I have had many experiences in which optimism have changed my perspective, from sadness to making the best of the situation, and I am proud and happy of how I handled those experiences.

I believe that optimism cures sadness. That if you make the best of every situation, something better will come along.

It was about a year ago, and my family was looking for a new house. We thought we had found the perfect one. It was beautiful, had a pool, and was close to school. We put a contract on it, and thought for sure it was the house for us. When the inspection came back though, we found that it had a big water pressure problem. If we bought the house, we would have to tear out all the walls and not live in it for a couple of years. My whole family was devastated because we had our hearts set on that house. But we decided not to buy it, and continue looking.

Almost a year later, we have found an amazing house. It is unique and is everything that we have been looking for, and more. We put a contract on the new house, and it has no major problems. We were ecstatic; we had found our dream home. Now, we are getting ready to sell our house, and soon we will move in. When some people might not look for houses for a while after an experience like this, we were optimistic and continued looking to find something better than the original.

Last year, I went to a camp in Michigan called Miniwanca. It was my second year going, and I was genuinely exited for it. Plus, two of my friends were coming with me that year. Coming off of the bus, I could smell the honeysuckle in the hot and humid air. I walked up to the check in desk, loving the feeling of sand squishing beneath my tennis shoes. “You will be in cabin 36 with Courtney, Meg, Libby, and Rose.” I stood there, shocked. None of my friends’ names were there that I had known. Why wasn’t I in a cabin with my friends? I don’t even know any of the people who are in the same cabin as me! As I approached my cabin, I felt depressed. This was not going to be the fun three weeks I had imagined.

Once I met the four girls who I would be cabin mates with and my cabin leader, Amanda, I felt a little better. But I still was thinking of all the fun my other friends were having, being in the same cabin together. Within the next couple days, I became really close friends with Meg. We made a pact; we would have as much fun as possible, making a fool of ourselves, and then laughing at it. We would not think about my other friends who were in the same cabin together. We did this all through the three weeks, and looking back on it now, I do not regret any of it. I made the best of the situation through laughter and optimism, and I am glad that I did not sulk the whole time because I was not with my friends.

I have had many experiences in which optimism have changed my perspective, from sadness to making the best of the situation, and I am proud and happy of how I handled those experiences.