Unnecessary Necessities

Farwa - Overland Park, Kansas
Entered on May 14, 2008
Age Group: Under 18

Unnecessary Necessities


“I’ve learned that although it’s hard to admit, I’m secretly glad that my parents are strict with me”.

I believe that having a cell phone is one of the main luxuries that a teenager feels she needs in her life. Is having one from a young age really that essential? Being one of the only seventh graders without a cell phone, I think not.

I attend a private school, and with all the other expenses, cell phones are an unnecessary financial burden at this time in my life. Not only that, they are a huge distraction. My friends are always saying how they can’t concentrate on their piles of homework when their cell phone is present.

With all the other activities, including homework, reading, and sports, a cell phone is not high on my priority list. I am lucky enough to know that I have the availability of elder people carrying their cell phones when I am out of the house. During 6th grade, I had a sense of exasperation because all my friends were getting cell phones. Even after the continuous complaints to my mother, I only received countered complacent explanations saying that a cell phone wasn’t necessary at the time. It has dawned on me that I can still manage without a cell phone for the time being.

In school for the past month, I have been reading Fahrenheit 451. In this particular book, which takes place in the future, the citizens are all banned from reading books. Books are said to cause pain because it allows people to think. Instead, having as much fun as possible is how the society has evolved. To do this, the citizens have an immense need for media and technology to fill the void left by the lack of books. Their technology is completely futile. In modern society, cell phones don’t allow you to think. You could be talking on the phone all day long. This makes it easy to miss the important details that happen in our everyday lives. Even when people are out in public, there is always someone who is continuously on their phone, missing out on the conversations being held in the group. This can often cause frustration.

My younger sister in 5th grade has the same issue. With everything that I have encountered these past two years, I believe that I can give her some advice. She is the solo child without a cell phone in her grade. I tell her that the older she gets, the more her maturity level will develop, just as mine has done. I agree with what my parents always say: Everything in life comes with time.