Team Communication

Noah - sandpoint, Idaho
Entered on May 7, 2008
Age Group: 18 - 30
Themes: community, sports

Team Communication

I believe that communication is the soul part of a team. As a sports fanatic I found that the most successful teams in all sports play with some sort of communication. Whether it’s being hand signals or just plain yelling at each other, they seem to get the job done. I also know that without communication a team can fall apart in the most intense or routine situations. It’s not every day you hear of a dramatic ending to a well played game.

As the day passes the sun starts to go down, the stadium starts to fill with fans. The players come out onto the field to warm up. As the clock winds down the fans are anxious to hear the umpire say those two big words “PLAY BALL!” The two very skillful teams battle it out as the game progresses. Back and forth, they take turns holding the lead. Finally it’s come down to the last inning. The score is tied and both pitchers are tired, but they stick it out so that their team doesn’t give up hope. The fist pitcher comes out and gives up no hits. His team is flawless throughout the defensive situations.

The second pitcher comes out, hoping that this will not be his final inning. He starts to feel the fatigue as he starts to pitch. His first pitch was smashed for a base hit. He tells himself, “shake it off, there is more ball to play. Don’t give up now!” The pitcher calms himself by taking a deep breath. His next three pitches were perfect, striking out the next batter, but it’s not over yet. It seems that things are not going to get better for the pitcher. The next two batters come up and both of them hit singles loading the bases. At this point his team starts to lose hope and the pitcher has never felt more focused on a game in his life. The pitcher digs into the mound, focused on the mitt. He blocks out all the fans who are yelling in the stands, and the other team who is cheering for the batter. His only focus is the mitt. He winds up and pitches. Three perfect pitches come flying out of his hand, as if he was throwing a fireball. The batter walks back to the dugout, not even getting a chance to swing his bat. After throwing three amazing pitches his team looks at him with hope once again.

The clock is winding down and the fans are on the edge of there seats. This is the moment that everyone has been waiting for. The bases are loaded, and there are two outs. The pitcher takes his position on the mound. As he begins his windup he loses his balance, causing him to throw a bad pitch. The pitcher shakes it off and comes back to the mound throwing a strike. The next pitch he causes the batter to foul it off. The pitcher has the upper hand with two strikes and one ball. He feels that he can end the inning with one fastball up and in. He rears back and fires. As the ball moves toward the mitt it appears that the ball is dead on. Then the batter swings, hitting the ball high into shallow right field. The right fielder charges in after the ball. The second baseman back peddles after the ball also. Neither of them says anything as they run for the ball, both of them are too determined to catch it. The ball begins to fall and still both defenders have no awareness of each other. As the ball gets close they collide and the ball drops to the ground. The pitcher is disappointed as a run scores ending the game.

A situation like this is few and far in between. I was the pitcher in this situation. Things don’t always turn out how you would expect it. The failure to communicate cost us the game. You never truly understand why you believe in something until you have been in a situation that applies to your belief. I believe that if you communicate you will be more successful.