Dice is God

Shyam - Saratoga, California
Entered on March 28, 2008
Age Group: 50 - 65
Themes: atheism

Dice is God

When I was growing up in a small village in India the villagers prayed to gods to use divine powers to liberate the sun and the moon from being digested by the evil demons who had swallowed them during the solar and lunar eclipses. All food cooked prior to the eclipse had to be thrown away believing the demons’ influence on them. Even my mother, who had no food to feed her seven children, had to throw away food and earthen cooking pots.

When I studied physics, I found out that the eclipses were mere shadows of the moon and the earth on each other. Our praying to gods to save them from being digested was unnecessary. My understanding of the laws of physics, and relationship of cause and effects demystified such beliefs. I believe; ignorance brings mystic powers of gods and fuels religions. I believe; Lord Jesus’ resurrection or walk on water, Lord Krishna lifting mountain on his little finger to save his villagers from drowning, Prophet Muhammad splitting the moon, are fictions.

Several years later, my first son was sitting on my lap in the same village among my friends on his first trip to India. One of them raised hands towards the sky and said, “God up there is taking care of us.” My son was only two years old then, said spontaneously, “I have been up there, there is only cloud. My plane has gone even above the clouds. God is not there.” The little boy said the truth; I believe there is no God.

Religions teaching the existence of God are limited to idealizing the notion of cause and effects. For example, prayer is often framed as the “cause”, which supposedly prefaces God’s miracle, or the “effect”. In that sense, God decides our future.

I believe, probability, that is, throw of dice determines our future

Disbelieving the probabilistic basis of Quantum Mechanics Einstein said, “God does not throw dice.”

From my understanding of Quantum Mechanics, I believe, “Dice is God.”

When I was a little boy, my Grandma told me a story from the Hindu epic, Mahabharata, how the kingdom was won by throw of biased dice. I realized the importance of throw of dice after I learned Quantum Mechanics. From my office I can see people walking on the street, but my especially tinted glass window does not allow them to see me. In Quantum Mechanical sense, tinting the glass has biased the dice to decrease the probability of light particles, photons, escaping from my office; while that increased the probability of photons to come from outside into my eyes.

In our daily life we always try to bias our dice to bring an outcome to our favor. For example, we work hard and study to bias our dice to get good job; we cultivate our land by drawing water from underground if the rain does not come. These effects are determined by pragmatic causes, not by prayer. I believe; dice determines our future. Dice is God.