I believe in exercise.

Jennifer - Piedmont, California
Entered on March 17, 2008
Age Group: Under 18

Jenny S

Ms. Weverka

Class 2, English



I believe in the power of exercise.

I believe that after you experience the wind blowing through your hair and feel your blood pumping hard through your veins, your entire outlook on life can be change within seconds. You could call it “working out” but I believe that the physical results are far less rewarding than the mental ones. Exercise is not just recommended as healthy from your doctor, it something that your body and soul hanker to and is only pushed aside for lack of time. Interestingly, that 20 minutes from a busy day, used to bike around the block or swim a few laps in the pool, could be all we need to rejuvenate from our stressful daily lives.

I believe that our bodies tell us how we are prioritizing our lives.

I believe that if we listened to our baggy eyes and our moaning stomachs and our aching brains, we would realize how vital exercise and peace are to thrive with happiness. I believe infectious and cancerous diseases infest in the bodies of whom need that peace.

Everyone has a particular routine, whether it’s taking the dog for a walk as you both trot briskly around the block or run up to the field for a pick up game of wiffle ball with the family. I believe that the combination of being out doors, breathing in the fresh air, absorbing the suns rays, releasing beads of sweat as you run, play, swim, bike, or walk, is the key to ecstasy.

This past year I was overwhelmed with boyfriend, identity and family problems. I was trapped in a endless pit and couldn’t seem to get out of depression. I had no where left to turn. I felt like every time I tried to be optimistic my mood couldn’t seem to alter from its belligerent and lonely state. One day, out of desperation, I spontaneously dug out my running shoes from their little nook in the back of my closet, and tied up the dusty laces. Previously, I had heard that getting exercise releases endorphins and could possibly even change my mood. Seeing as I had nothing else left to try, and it couldn’t possibly hurt, I walked out the door and started to jog. As my pace quickened to a sprint, I felt as if the load I had been carrying around for so long was being lifted off of me, and the pessimistic mood was shedding off through my profuse sweat. I felt a satisfactory burning sensation in my muscles, but my mind was racing with motivation to turn my life around and reclaim my former self.

I believe in the power of exercise.