I Believe in Self Discipline

Michael - Wichita, Kansas
Entered on March 3, 2008
Age Group: Under 18

I Believe in Self Discipline

If I must describe my beliefs in one phrase, I say that I believe in self discipline.

I do not tell my tale as someone who might generally be associated with self discipline. I have no amazing and especially unique family life. My story merely details the life of a student and an athlete. Still, I feel as though I have made it as far as I have in life because of my self discipline.

As a student and athlete in my junior year, I have come to experience the full force of the college-preparatory International Baccalaureate Programme. While not only teaching students critical thinking to the highest degree, IB also produces a high level of stress for its diploma candidates. For instance, in my freshman year alone about twenty people quit out of a class of about 150. The heavy homework loads not only cause stress, but teach students the value of proper time management. This forced me to dedicate myself to the program under penalty of failure. I continue to remain strong in my success in the IB. The fact is, and the IBO agrees with me, that students must be able to deal with the constant rigors of academic stress in order to succeed in college. That means that a successful student must be capable strong self discipline and I credit my success with my ability to endure that stress and to manage my time.

Next, as a football player, I have learned that self discipline is the sole key to success. In preparation during summer I needed the proper attitude in order to force myself to go to weight training every day, and in the season itself I needed to endure the very physical practices and then go right to work for school when I got home. As I have continued through the past year, every blow dealt to me and every pain incurred only steeled my resolve to continue. No matter what the odds, I never lost my control and focus. For instance, when my team played the number one school in our league, Bishop Carroll, as the long snapper I needed to snap the ball to the punter from our own eight yard line at one point in the game. I made a critical mistake and the ball flew right over his head. Despite this extremely embarrassing public event, I kept calm and played my best game of the year.

My academic survival and athletic success derives from my discipline to do what I need to do instead of what I want to do. I want to relax and get together with my friends, but I know when I cannot. I want to think about how to improve myself and to rationalize my public mistakes, but I know when the proper time is and when to concentrate on the task at hand. Because of this, I believe in self discipline.