Everyone Has A Teenage Girl In Them

Natalie - New Port Richey, Florida
Entered on February 27, 2008
Age Group: Under 18

Comedian Dane Cook did a comedy routine based on his belief that there is one person in every group of friends that nobody likes, and hearing that made me realize something. Everybody has a teenage girl in them. Trust me, she’s in there screaming to get out, and she succeeds more than you think.

Everybody has a teenage girl in them, and we all show teenage girl-like characteristics. We all stereotype, judge and gossip. Even adults do it. I see it all the time. They gossip about co-workers, family, and friends. They judge us kids by our appearance, although they would never admit it. Everybody gossips and stereotypes. Whether it’s telling your friends at lunch about how the chick you absolutely hate fell on her face in gym, or talking about how many ugly people there are at our school; we all do it, and it comes from our inner teenage girl.

Keeping my teenage girl quiet can actually help you. It is a practice in patience and self-control. There’s this girl I know who has to say bad things about everybody she sees. It has to be the most annoying thing in the world, and you have no idea how many times I’ve wanted to hit her in the face for being so rude. Yet I keep the inner teenage girl quiet, and consequently I’m becoming a patient, more controlled person. I know that keeping my mouth shut and my hands at my side is easier said than done, but it really pays off.

Everybody has a teenage girl in them and she wants to look like a celebrity. Why else would everyone be dieting all the time? “I wanna be healthy,” is the popular excuse, but what’s healthy? Nothing more than my inner teenage girl yearning to imitate the looks of the beautiful people… celebrities, duh!

I believe that everybody has a teenage girl in them. Everybody has teenage girl-like characteristics, and this inner-teenage girl wants nothing more than to look like a celebrity. And don’t forget that keeping her mouth shut works to your advantage. So next time I’m listening to one of Dane Cook’s “epiphanies,” I know to stop, listen, and look deeper into what he’s saying, and maybe I’ll learn something new about myself and the world my teenage-girl and I live in.