The Long Road to Second Chances

Jeff - Northville, Michigan
Entered on February 18, 2008

The problem with drug-induced euphoria is that the euphoric feeling always ends and one is left unsatisfied, only craving the next high. This idea was unfamiliar to me until the summer before high school. For an unknown reason, I decided to begin the lifestyle of a drug addict, a person dependent on chemicals for happiness. Indeed, it is as they say, drugs send you spiraling head first down a vacuous hole. Being young and feeling invincible blocks this inevitable truth. I believed I was enlightened with all the answers to life.

My addiction started slowly with the occasional usage of alcohol and marijuana, but eventually these substances no longer fulfilled my desired euphoria. Ecstasy, cocaine and Oxycontin quickly became a part of my life. Each drug when used in excess begins to leave its signature mark on you both physically and mentally. For instance, cocaine deteriorated the insides of my nostrils and caused frequent nosebleeds, not to mention left me sleep deprived and constantly paranoid that someone was after me.

Ecstasy left me emotionless, malnourished and unable to form a sentence without slurring all the words together. After one year of using Ecstasy everyday religiously, I became what one might refer to as a “dead man walking.” Oxycontin provided me nothing good as well. At that time, none of this mattered to me. I was hooked, too far gone to care enough to change.

Inspiration to correct the unforgivable path I was on came to me one Thursday night during my senior year in early spring. After picking up a large quantity of illegal substances in Detroit, a police car pulled me over and proceeded to search my vehicle. They threw me in jail and charged me with a double felony. Despite my initial response to what had happened I slowly began to recognize this as a blessing in disguise.

I believe in second chances. No matter how big or small the mistake, everyone deserves the chance to modify their behavior. We as humans are not created perfect. It is not hard to lose your way and fall into bad things. I am very thankful for the night I was arrested because it provided me with the eye opener necessary to correct the direction I was headed. Unfortunately it often takes an extreme event to make a person aware of their actions but if that is what it takes, then so be it. No matter how far gone one might be, they will always have the chance to better themselves.

The second chance I received provided me with a light at the end of the tunnel. Although the road to recovery is long and hard, I am confident that I will succeed in gaining sobriety. I have caused irreversible damage to my mind and body during the past years, and I strongly regret everything I have done. I know that if I can change the path that I was on, then others can too. This is why I believe in second chances.