This I Believe

Robert - Brighton, Illinois
Entered on June 24, 2005
Age Group: 50 - 65
Themes: Christianity

I BELIEVE IN MIRACLES

Do you believe in miracles? I do. As a Christian and a preacher I believe in

miracles because I believe in the God with whom nothing is too hard, all things are

possible and who truly is almighty. As a preacher I have been privileged to see the hand

of God stretched forth in my meetings from time to time and therefore witness the power

of God give sight to the blind, cause the lame to walk and miraculously turn deaf ears into

ears that hear. But the greatest miracle ever to unfold before me was on a day that I

myself was so very much in need of a miracle. I can still remember that day as if it were only yesterday. It was a day that everything seemed to fall apart and all looked lost. Because of the tremendous stress, that has been unequaled ever since, all hope was

draining from my heart. The situation was totally out of my hands and beyond anything I

could do in the natural. But with the last drops of hope remaining in my heart, I cried out

to God. And on that day I was blessed to see the dead raised to life!

The miracle I am speaking of was the birth of my son, Caleb Joshua. My wife,

Marilyn, and I had been married five years at that time. And although we desired to have

a child; because of a terrible car accident that left her paralyzed from the neck down

(which by the way, she no longer is. Why? Because God is the God of miracles!). And

because of all the surgeries and all the internal damage in her body, pregnancy was

thought to probably be impossible. But if there is one thing I have learned, it is that

impossible has no possible affect when it comes to God. And at the age of 41, Marilyn

gave birth to Caleb, our answer to prayer. Marilyn’s pregnancy was an exciting and

enjoyable time. She had a model pregnancy. There wasn’t any morning sickness and she

was strong and healthy. She did begin to snore quite loudly at night, which I have on tape to this day. Other than that, things seemed perfect and we were having the time of our lives getting things ready for Caleb’s arrival. We were always busy running to the stores and buying this and that and getting the nursery all set up. It was a great adventure. But toward the end of it everything began to change. Storm clouds began to blow in and

darken our sunny days. Marilyn got very sick. Some of her internal organs started to shut down and her life was in danger. She had come to full term in the pregnancy, therefore, it was decided to do an emergency C section. The doctor who had been caring for her was on vacation, and because of Marilyn’s medical history and the critical nature of the situation, two other doctors and a room full of nurses were called upon to take part in and witness what can only be defined as the miraculous. One of the doctors is our family physician today, and to this day he will tell you that he has read about miracles, he has heard of miracles, but that day he truly saw a miracle. The C section that should have

taken about one hour, instead went on for several hours. And when everything was done

that could humanly be done, Marilyn ended up in intensive care and Caleb was dead. But

then, before the eyes of all, a totally blue and dead baby suddenly breathed in the breath of

life and his skin began to turn pink. A helicopter was summoned to fly him over to

Children’s Hospital and I was told to get down there as soon as possible. As I was driving

to Children’s Hospital I cried out to God and prayed, “Please. Please God. Please don’t

let Marilyn and the baby die.” At that, deep in my heart, I gently heard the Lord say, “If

you will begin to thank Me now, I will take up this battle.” Every day for the next six

days I stood beside Caleb’s crib in the natal intensive care unit and kept saying, “I thank

you, Jesus, for who you are and for all you have promised me.” I kept giving thanks,

strengthening my faith and becoming fully persuaded that God did have the power to do

what He had promised. And on the day before Thanksgiving, 1989, I proudly, joyfully,

and most of all, thankfully brought Marilyn and Caleb home from their hospitals.

Today, Marilyn is as feisty as ever, and thankfully she no longer snores. Caleb is

now fifteen years old. He is strong, healthy, intelligent and a wonderful blessing to many

people. Ever since he was three years old he has been telling us that when he grows up he

is going to be a heart surgeon and always take care of me and Marilyn. I have absolutely no doubts about that, because I believe in miracles.