This I Believe

Milica - Cincinnati, Ohio
Entered on December 3, 2007
Age Group: Under 18

In the Eye

Doom is coming. Let it come. I can’t recall where I first encountered these words, but I remember the impressed smile they instantly brought to my face, and the way its glint reflected inside of me and allowed something there to soar. The message was inspiring and drew me with a breath-taking intensity. I was standing on the peak of a glorious mountain and looking around at endless beauty. What made that statement so powerful was its fiercely brave defiance. It promised to take any missile loosed toward it head-on and not to falter for even a moment. I believe in facing any issue, however impossible or frightening, with head held high and lips curved upward, because doom can not handle a smile.

There is a song by Suzanne Vega called In The Eye, in which she sings “if you were to kill me now right here I would still look you in the eye. . .I would not run I would not turn I would not hide” This again conveys that idea of taking on whatever comes with open arms. The issue faced could be no more than a difficult exam, or no less than a soldier marching out to a battlefield he does not know if he will return from. It is applicable to an infinite range of situations. It is so alluring because it allows me to believe in myself and find the smile in every situation.

Of course there are, and always will be, times when I feel completely disheartened, but this philosophy comes to my rescue each time without fail. A friend of mine and I take a walk every Sunday night to vent out the last frustrations of the week and divulge worries about the coming one. We always end on a confident note, and it helps boost us into Monday. I remember a night when we were feeling particularly hopeless, unable to reason out issues or see an end to emotional roller coasters. We were reaching the bottom of a hill when something reminded me of doom is coming, let it come. The transformation I felt was almost instantaneous as an incredible energy welled up within my lungs. I remember grinning and throwing my arms out, turning to my friend and voicing it, “Doom is coming. Let it come.” We ran then, just tore across the pavement with something wild and inexplicable beneath our soles. Everything that was wrong–Darfur, AP History exams, poverty, angry parents–seemed manageable. It was not solved, it was not simple, but we had the strength to take it and not let it trample us.

I don’t understand how a simple phrase can have that effect on me. I don’t know why it works so unfailingly. But I believe in it. I believe in the strength it lends me when I have none. I believe in the way it allows me to stand straight and say, “If doom is coming, then let it come.”