This I Believe

Natalie - Austin, Texas
Entered on October 12, 2007
Age Group: 18 - 30
Themes: family

I believe in burying myself in warm towels on a cold day. I believe in snuggling underneath the clean smell of detergent and the toasty feel of terry. One of the things I miss most about home now that I am away at college is my mother doing laundry. The first set she does is the towels. When they came out of the dryer she used to let me bury myself in them until they cooled off. I especially loved doing this on the colder days of the year. As winter approaches I miss the knowledge that once a week I can loose myself in the warm towels. I believe in holding on to the security of my family. Even if that can only be done by clinging to the warmth of freshly laundered towels

Warm towels offer a sense of security. For the few minutes they stay warm out of the dryer, the happiness I feel as I submerge myself their folds make me feel as though nothing can go wrong. The joy of a warm towel is about finding the love and security of my family in a feeling that I can take with me. Holding onto my family in a way that is not keeping me at home, a warm towel on a cold day reminds me of my family and reminds me that they are there, even though I am not. Though I believe in the security of a warm towel, I also believe in letting go.

Moving away wasn’t as hard as I thought it would be. Only twenty minutes away in good traffic, my family is close at hand. But I can’t go home for every laundry day and every warm towel that comes out of the dryer. I know my mom is there, and I know she loves me. I know this with every towel I must now wash and dry myself. Sometimes I bury my face in a freshly clean towel that I have washed with a little more detergent than I should. It is in these moments that I forget where I am and remember lying in a pile of brightly colored terry cloth towels, softened by the Snuggle bear. I believe that the love of my family follows me everywhere.

When I left home I was under the impression that the ties to my family would loosen. I wouldn’t call them everyday or even think about them. But I’ve realized that moving away only tightened our bond as a family. I look forward to the day where I must drop eight quarters to make sure I have clean underwear and a fresh towel to use. I remember my family as I remove my purple towels with my name monogrammed on them. It is in the security of a warm towel that you can find family and happiness. I believe in keeping my family close, as long as I can wash and dry the bond for no more than two dollars.