This I Believe

Cheryl - Los Angeles, California
Entered on August 5, 2007

I thought I was steadfast in my beliefs…until I became a mother. As a single parent, my roles include provider, cook, playmate, super, teacher, maid, friend, nurse, protector and spiritual guide. I constantly face the delicate balance of deciding when to help my son and when to step aside and let him do for himself. As fragile as a baby is, I found my son’s strength, adaptability and desire to learn from day one, nothing short of amazing. Now at age seven, he has constant inquiries to get straight his facts, values and viewpoints. Sometimes his questions are offhand, other times much seems to ride on my answers. Occasionally, I’ll respond with “what do you think?” to assess his reasoning. For facts, we turn to books, but there are so many questions that take supposition. But in getting to know my son, I believe we come into this world with our own personal “belief disposition.”

I realize the importance a parent’s beliefs on a child, so I when he asks, I will tell him what I think. I want him to understand the importance of faith and moral ground, and I know we will discuss much in the coming years. Already, I think my son and I share some of the basics: a belief in God and in free will…the power of nature and the power of love…that we work too much and play too little. We both know the importance of having a sense of humor. There are life lessons he needs to learn however, and I’d like to be gentle in their delivery. I believe the quality most worthy of developing is self-worth. I believe the golden rule isn’t more practiced is because so many people’s souls are suffering, deeply and in so many ways. I believe too many children are treated like possessions, or worse, and that we are far too lax in dealing with this problem. I believe dreams are good but plans are better, and “B” plans” are advised. I believe that no one should take the unexamined word of any media, government, religion, corporation or person with an agenda. I believe when we die, our soul is free to be itself – – whatever that is.

I believe I was very lucky to have you at the age of 43, dear boy, and that you are healthy, bright, funny, loving, neat, considerate, creative and independent.

I believe you know full well that I am utterly flawed, and that you love me anyway. I believe you know I’ll love you unconditionally and for eternity, and that if I have done everything else imperfectly in my life but be a good mother to you…I believe that will be enough.