This I Believe

Cindy - Orem,, Utah
Entered on May 22, 2007

The math curse

“Sally has 2 apples and Adam has 4, how many apples do they have all together?” little hands shoot though the air like sling shots that were just waiting to be fired, yells from 5 and 6 year olds say “Pick me! Pick me!” this is a typical kindergarten class and that was a typical kindergarten question. But unlike all the other kindergarten kids I would scrunch my face in thoughtful anguish about the whole math concept, I hated math! At a young age I was tormented by; the math curse. But deep down inside I believed that I could overcome the math.

“If all of my friends are in algebra and I am in math 7th, considering that I’m not all that great at math how many times will I ask for help?” the answer is too high to count. I can still remember sitting at the lunch table with all my friends (aka), the “smart kids” the kids that to me seemed to be able to do any math problem. I wanted to be one of them because they were simple, but with a great talent. I believed I could catch up to them in all areas except for math.

“If I have 3 brothers that aren’t exactly supportive and 2 parents who seemed sympathetic, how much family support will I get?” about 50% When I told my family that I wanted to learn more math their jaws dropped in disbelief. But none the less I believed that I could break the math curse. So I did math.

“If I have 12 chapters in my text book and only 3 months to do it, how many hours a day will I have to do of math?” the answer is three hours a day. I thought that my days seemed so long every beautiful summer day I watched all the kids playing outside through my window. It sucked but I stuck with my math, I believed that I could break this horrible math curse.

“During a summer, how long will it take my mind to burn-out?” two months, two months into the summer I couldn’t help but give up hope I was done. I cried and a quit. After what seemed to be a decade of feeling sorry for myself I decided that I should go on but then the inner power kicked in. Even though I cried and quit, I kept going.

“After 308 hours of math during the summer and 12 chapters of math did I finish my math?” Yes, after all the work I took a competency test and passed the class. A B-. I was simply pleased with myself. I had just shattered my math cruse, what else could I want?

Striving and struggling I got through my math. ven though I was tormented by the math curse I believed that I could break it. I believe that I can break the math curse; I believe I can break any curse.