This I Believe

Hayden - Davie, Florida
Entered on March 14, 2007

I believe there is a universal language – money. Anything is possible…when you are rich. Many people say money is unnecessary to make something of your life, but let’s be honest, there has never been a president that has come out of the Bronx, and very few successful businessmen from poor and rural Africa. As the quote in many movies goes, “Money talks,” and I believe having money is key to propelling anyone’s future.

I have been fortunate enough to be born into a pretty well-off family, in which I get the advantage of a home to come back to every night, and a private school education to help me achieve my life goals. Many children around the world sleep on the cold, hard streets and receive neither life guidance nor even basic education. You cannot tell me that this child, having minimal education, will have the same chance to succeed as a well educated child from a wealthy family. Americans like to believe that every person has the ability to get somewhere with their lives and be successful. This may be true, but children born into well-off families begin their lives a step ahead of the rest of the not so fortunate children.

The quality of education a child receives helps to shape his or her character. From confidence to self consciousness, and intelligence to stupidity, different school atmospheres change the way children view themselves and their ability to succeed. Most kids don’t have the choice to switch schools if they get picked on since there is usually only one public school per district. This simple, yet harmful act of teasing a child can change the course of a child’s life. While bullying is not only found in poor neighborhoods, it can be prevented when one has the money to pay for their children to transfer to a private school.

Most people who own a home often take it for granted, and do not think of all the people living on the streets or in subsidized housing, not only in America, but all over the world. The common perception about these homeless people is that, “That’s the best they deserve.” This logic stems from the idea that most homeless people have done drugs or steal for a living. Knowing a homeless family personally, I know this stereotype is wrong and I understand how quickly a family can go from “riches to rags.” When walking past homeless people, and average person usually whispers to themselves, “Get a job!” This is easier said than done. When filling out a job application and a person has no address to put down, the employer feels this person is irresponsible and unstable and would rather give the job to the person who is situated even if they are not as qualified.

Most people know America as “The land of opportunity.” While this is true, the door of opportunity is open wider to people with money.