This I Believe

Kyle - Weatherford, Texas
Entered on January 31, 2007
Age Group: 18 - 30
Themes: question

I believe in the power of the conscience. I believe that the ability for people to reason between right and wrong is imbedded into our minds. However, at the same time, I also believe that the surrounding environment can shape the conscience of man in a positive or negative fashion. Through time and conditioning at an impressionable stage, a mind can be either trained with compassion or warped with evil. I say this not to define human nature, but to give the perception as to why certain cultures behave and believe in different ways.

Many Americans consider the Holy Bible to be the supreme book, the truth, the answers to life’s problems, and the start of a new life. The Bible teaches the values of compassion, forgiveness, and unconditional love. These characteristics are unarguably virtuous and will all lead to a life with meaning and happiness. When I read the words of Matthew 22:39, “Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself”, I instinctively agree. As a child I was brought up being taught core Christian beliefs and they have been instilled in me ever since. My mother and father are both in the profession of helping children, so I have heard the stories of triumph and sorrow. I am a firm believer of this statement from my father: “There’s no such thing as a bad kid, but there are kids who do bad things.

I believe that we as people are built with the same emotions and conscience. The Bible is simply an excellent reinforcer. Matthew, Mark, Luke, John and the carpenter were undoubtedly a great group of guys. Their lessons on life are to be praised, and their work will be ever-remembered. However, putting your faith in the recordings of an ancient text is difficult for me to dive in to. History is skewed, and reality is deeply challenged by many parts of The Bible. A realist faces many different problems when interpreting The Bible to coincide with their logic.

Cheating on your wife or taking another man’s life are actions that feel terribly wrong. Having empathy for others governs our thought process, therefore The Ten Commandments is not necessary for a non-believer to know what he is doing is wrong. This humanistic standpoint enables us to be accepting and non-judgmental, much unlike a majority of the growing Christian population. All religions have the same themed idea, yet they slightly vary in traditions and practices among different cultures. This proves that religion stems from the work of man. All people feel these similar emotions; Christianity just happens to lie in our geographical zone. We have the ability to improve life. I believe that Christianity is not the answer. I believe that religion is not the answer. I believe that digging deep into your ever-present conscience will tell you the answers to your most debatable questions.