This I Believe

Angelica - Aliso Viejo, California
Entered on December 25, 2006

“Belief”: a two syllable, six letter title for something that one supposes to be true. No, I do not suppose, I trust, and I am assured. Throughout my life I have been given the opportunity to form my own distinct beliefs about everything from the purpose of life to why guys seem to prefer blondes over brunettes. Oh, and just so I am not leaving anyone hanging- the purpose of life is to find ones own purpose, and guys prefer blondes because the color is more eye-catching. My last boyfriend was colorblind.

Regardless, the most important belief I have formed in my short sixteen years of life, is the one I have in myself. I strongly believe that every individual has been blessed with one special talent that he or she is meant to foster and use for all its worth. Some peoples’ talents become full college scholarships, such as being an incredible athlete or student. Some talents carry people to foreign countries, big businesses, or on to the silver screen. Not all talents, though, translate so easily to rewards.

My greatest talent is my ability to relate to and help others. It is a gift that will never help my GPA or be my ticket into Notre Dame. It is one that will not fit easily on to any job application or be the reason why I am selected for varsity sports. My talent is rewarding in an entirely different and still completely irreplaceable manner.

My talent first began to unfold when I was just a child. It began with a simple yet strong intuition for the well-meaning or less-than-well-meaning nature of others. By the time I was in middle school I began to recognize I had the ability not only to separate friends from foes, but also to sense the emotions of those around me, all with relative ease.

A sense of discouragement is one of the easiest to recognize, it is marked by different peculiarities of conduct. A subtle hesitation, the way a girl allows her hair to fall in front of her face or touches her lips while speaking are all clues to how she is feeling. Boys, on the other hand, frequently sit up straighter, over-compensate or tell uncomfortable jokes to cast off unwanted attention.

Just by watching, living, learning, listening, and going with my gut instincts, I have acquired a keen sense for what people need in times of loss, sadness, anger, and discouragement. While some need simply to hear that everything is going to be alright, for others a listening ear, or a fifteen-minute-long pep-talk will do the trick. Whatever it may be, I have been blessed with the ability to sense and fill that need.

I believe in myself. I believe that although my talent is not rewarding in a finite and tangible way, it has and will continue to shape my life. I believe that, if fostered with care, my talent will translate into something much greater than my young mind can yet comprehend. This I believe.