This I Believe

Brandon - Troy, Idaho
Entered on December 6, 2006

The Belief of Winning

Have you ever wanted something so bad you drained all your energy, gave your blood, sweat and tears, just to have it?

I believe in winning. Winning is not something everyone gets to have, winners are not people that everyone gets to be. Life is broken up into three categories: the winners, the losers, and the spectators. The winners are the people that do the best they can do, which is better than the other people they face. The losers are the people that did it, but failed, and are often forgotten. The spectators are the people that sit in the bleachers, watching everyone else do something, and nothing for themselves but cheer on the competitors.

Winning is the key to happiness. I have never lost and said, “Well that was fun.” The first person to say, “Do your best, and if you fail, well then, you tried,” probably came from a person that lost a lot. Losers whine about their best and walk away with hung heads while the winners walk off with the fans behind them and the gold in their hands.

I believe in winning, as well as glory. There are winning moments, and there are glory moments. The glory moments come when you didn’t just win, but you crushed the competition in a big moment. It’s the times at a high level of competition, and you take the moment for yourself and those behind you. Winning is what you hold on to for the moment, glory is what people hold to for you for a lifetime.

There was a State Final game last year and my team took second, I wasn’t a starter, so I am thankful I won’t be remembered for that game, but I also didn’t get a chance to play, so I had no chance of being a winner, involved with something that was won.

Glory is something that when you succeed and move to a higher level, such as a State Final game, it is put in front of you. Glory is then not offered, or given, but forced upon you. As you step onto the court for your final game, people do not say, “do your best”, people look at you with a smile and say, “win this.” People put on that smile as a soothing gesture for you so they do not look so stern, but deep inside themselves they are really saying “or else.” The comment people do not speak is not meant as a threat, but as a memory they will recall. The memory of someone trying, and failing, becoming nothing on the walls of the gym that they will forever return to and watch other people follow in the many footsteps before them, laid on Glory Road.

When someone does succeed, they are given the recognition, the gold, the glory, the unforgettable memory of what they accomplished. The memory blazes white with blue and red lettering on the walls of their home dome. It lies there, gleaming, smiling like the fans as they storm the court at the ringing of the last second off the clock.

Forever it screams in the gym, like the fans, but in silence it holds itself from being heard, but seen it is forever. It screams three words until the end of time: victory, glory, and winners.

I believe in winning at everything I do. Those that say, “You can’t win them all,” have never believed it possible to win everything, therefore never gave it their all. You can win at everything you do, because it is the opportunity that is laid before you. If you have the opportunity to do something, it can be done.