This I Believe

Matthew - Virginia Beach, Virginia
Entered on December 6, 2006

There are two emotions that have always shared a yin-and-yang relationship inside people, and decide whether we show our subservience or dominance; those emotions are love and hate respectively; personally, I prefer hate. I hate my ex because she talked too much and never got to the point, I hate stairs because they’re slow and people always get in the way, I hate traffic… for the same reason I hate stairs.

Once hate has been established, the situation becomes simpler, as hate puts a variety of tools at my disposal. My hate can be manifested as rage, which makes me stronger, faster, and often gives tunnel-vision towards an objective; spite, which makes me cold and calculating by weighing options, planning conversations, and coming up with elaborate schemes to achieve an objective; or revulsion, which will have me doing everything possible to prevent encountering the object of my hatred, be it a person I detest for no particular reason or a situation I’d rather not be in, such as failure. There are few situations that a proper dose of hate could not improve upon, and even though I use it so often, the power of my hate to achieve mastery over my abilities hasn’t diminished.

As a former telemarketer and drive-thru operator, I’ve learned the value of hating people I have yet to meet as well. The beauty behind hate is that unlike love, hate doesn’t have to be specific. I can hate anything that passes through a doorway, and exact my revenge upon them for doing so through the purchase of a $6.47 Fish and More with a drink when I know they could get the same product for $5.51 by just ordering it differently, or a $200 charge to their credit card for $60 worth of magazines, because I’m so nice I couldn’t possibly be scamming them, while in the back of my mind I’m deciding between People or USA Today for their poverty-stricken funeral. I can instead hate my job and do the inverse without questioning my loyalty to the company, and this inferred benevolence will net me rewards from the customer, whether it be rapport or cash prizes.

Hate is so powerful, yet so many refuse to harness it into something productive; instead forcing it to build up and manifest in an outburst or tantrum, which while powerful in their own right, are rarely acceptable and often end in either violence, regret, or both. Should they use the hate properly, and apply it to the situation rather than ignoring it, not only would they not lose control of it, but likely would be successful in whatever they were attempting, and it would therefore be unnecessary to flail their spouse to death with the toaster.

Ultimately, I believe hate is man’s most powerful tool, and he is given the power to wield it without mercy. The decision whether or not to use it though, rests on the man as well.