This I Believe

Ronnie - Micanopy, Florida
Entered on December 3, 2006

An acquaintance once stated that she spent most of her reading time on acknowledged facts as apposed to reading fiction. She qualified her belief with something like: I have a limited time for reading, why waist it on fiction! Her comments sparked questions with results as follows. Susan, I thought you may be interested in the ignition that your comments provoked.

Nonfiction evolved with human history, producing theories in all manors of our biological and physical reality. For an example: our ability to rationalize time, angles, velocity, dimensions, counting…. grew with mans toying with innovations that brought us out of our pre-historic existence. What if our reasoning evolved following a different branch where our mathematical abilities had long ago defined the unification theory of mater; where Cantor, Euler, Bernoullis. Euclid, …. proposed different rational theories of mathematics?

In short, non-fiction represents our best guess of what our reality is about. No doubt, we have come a long way to maturation and understanding, making the best of our limited knowledge. We consider many of our established truths as absolute, effectively prohibiting other possibilities that do not follow the established order of understanding. Our evolution has given me this PC to type out my thoughts, what if we evolved telepathically to readily know each others thoughts?

Fiction embodied our presence long before nonfiction, uses psychic rationalization to define our existence. Assuredly, our evolution of reality as we know it channels our thoughts in a specific organized fashion enabling organized communications. However, each of us has the ability to explore other possibilities of reality, where language is merely the communication tool; where psychic discovery through the reading of fiction may yield sensual enlightenment of a different kind. We cannot all be equal to Einstein, Hawkings, or Brian Green in the understanding of matter and the outer limits of space. However, we all can be equal to the great thinkers by exploring the psychic interpretation of reality through various authors of fiction, who explore the limits of the human condition. As a plus to reading fiction we get to learn about different cultures, consequently different ways people see things, different mannerisms and beliefs.

Even fantasy writing has a viable place of exploration, as evident where many young (and some fortunate older) minds, not yet programmed, are entertained beyond universal reality. The percentage of our intellectual powers are minuscule as compared to the potential. I think it’s fair to say that we know less than 1% of our physical reality. The chasm between the known and unknown is so great the peoples of this earth have endorsed a superior being (varying according to culture) to mitigate our circumstance.

I believe we all need a balance of both, one to be in tune with the rest of humanity, and the other to explore the intrinsic makeup of mankind. Nonfiction seeks to give our physical presence foundation, while fiction seeks to understand the varied attributes of human behavior.

I believe the following poem by Emily Dickinson and the espouse of perspective by an unknown author and Alexander Pope fairly summarizes my perspective.

Emily Dickinson

The Brain-is wider than the sky-

For-Heft them-pound for pound-

The one the other will contain

With ease-and you beside-

The brain is deeper than the sea-

For hold them-blue to blue- The one the other will absorb-

As sponges-Buckets do-

The Brain is just the weight of God-

For-Heft them-pound for pound-

And they will differ-if they do-

As syllable from sound

A Cosmic Perspective- And a New Beginning, author unknown

God is cosmic and organismic mind,

Mind is an electromagnetic computer field,

Matter is energy transformed,

Earth is a speck in the cosmos,

Man is a cell in the dust,

Science is an electron in search of an orbit,

Theory is one of many orbits,

Fact is fiction in perspective,

The End is just a new beginning…….

Alexander Pope

‘Tis education forms the common mind;

Just as the twig is bent, the tree’s inclined.