This I Believe

Allison - Cincinnati, Ohio
Entered on November 2, 2006

What’s Amazing about Being Honest

It’s my sophomore year in high school and I’m walking to my first bell with my best friend and as we got closer to the door I realized that there was something green in the doorway. I bent down to pick it up and it was a five dollar bill. I looked at it thinking it was my friends, but it wasn’t. My teacher looked at the dollar in my hand, and I turned to her and went to give it to her. I looked at the class asking if anyone was missing a five dollar bill, and this girl looked at me and said she just had one in her back pocket and it wasn’t there anymore. I gave her the dollar, like it was a normal thing.

I never thought that it would be such a big deal. My teacher gave me this “Wow I can’t believe you did that” type of look. She was astonished that I didn’t’ keep the dollar. I started to walk to my seat and she said “Allie that was a really good thing you just did there, a really good thing.” I honestly think she said it about 20 times. She tells me the action I made to finding this bill, deserved some extra participation points. I’m not going argue with that. Heck, it’s my first bell, and I’m never awake to get the full participation points at the end of the week. I smiled and said “okay.”

I sat down and she walked over with a paper in her hand telling me I deserved an award. She gave me one of those halves a piece of paper awards you used to get in the 3rd grade, but I wasn’t complaining. Half of me enjoyed getting that much gratitude for doing such a simple task.

Of course I’m not always completely honest. Especially with my parents. They ask “Did you create this mess? Of course not,” I say. Then blaming it on my younger brother. Everyone does that. But when it comes to other things such as not being charged the right amount at lunch and you know it’s supposed to be more, and the dollar bill incident, it seems natural to be honest with the person.

People are honest with me; I think I should owe them the same back. People act like it’s the hardest thing to look someone in the eye and be honest. Of course looking your parents in the eye when you’re in trouble, eyes looking like fire and they’re going to burn the daylight out of you if you look at them, you would be scared to be honest. I learned the hard way that being honest with your parent in the beginning is better than being honest later on. Lots of trouble!

Next time you’re faced with being honest, try to be honest with someone. This, I believe, is one of the most important things in my life.