This I Believe

Luke - Sparta, Michigan
Entered on May 11, 2006
Age Group: 18 - 30

I believe that it is much harder to be an authority figure than I thought. I had always thought that being in power would be really easy and fun, but now I see that it takes a lot of responsibility and work. It seems to me that people spend more time criticizing problems they believe leadership has than they do working on fixing problems. I am speaking most specifically about politics.

Too often people blame the government for the problems in the country, and people tend to blame the political party that is running the country at that time. We don’t look past our political views to other reasons for problems. I am not trying to say one political party is better than another; I am just saying that I believe that people don’t give enough respect to the leaders of the country and what they do, whether the leader be Democrat, Republican, Independent, or whatever.

Respecting those in authority means more than just accepting them as leaders. It means to respect the decisions they make even if those decisions do not agree with what you believe. I have found this hard to do with political leaders and even some of my friends. When someone makes a decision I dislike, I immediately judge them for it. I have to remind myself that other people are allowed to have their opinions and I’m allowed to have mine. I dislike people who are so obsessed with their own ideas they refuse to see any other side of the problem. This sort of attitude will not help anyone. Yelling and arguing about something won’t get the job done.

I believe that in order to accomplish anything in this country, or even in the world, people need to be willing to respect others enough to realize that not everyone has the same beliefs as you do. In order to get anything done, people have to work together. When Democrats and Republicans blame each other for everything imaginable to hurt the other’s reputation, what does this accomplish? Absolutely nothing! It only hurts the images of both parties because the public will not be able to trust either political party at all.

Instead of all this blaming of our leaders and accusing them of everything, what if we wrote to our congressmen or got out and voted or did something other than just talking. What if instead of blaming each other for things, our leaders came up with ways that would help the poor or improve education or fix other problems. Then, instead of the party that can put the most dirt on the other winning an election, the party who will help the country the most would win. It is an idealistic idea, yes, but that doesn’t mean we can’t try.